(referenced to Contemporary Topics, 4th edition, Pearson)  A key to creating and maintaining engaging online classes, with maximum student participation,  is to “flip” the classroom.  A “flipped classroom” is basically an instructional strategy and a type of “blended” learning in which students are expected to do certain activities outside of class meeting time and to participate actively in “live” class meetings.  Ideally,...
(referenced to Contemporary Topics, 4th edition, Pearson) As teachers, we know that a major part of our job is coaching students:  providing motivation, encouragement, and guidance.  While it is essential of course that we provide expert knowledge of the language, solid instruction, accurate feedback, and reliable assessment, too much “instruction” and too little “coaching” can lead to demotivation for a...
Teaching pronunciation is usually done by two methods: “listen and repeat” and “correction.” “Say it this way” and “No, that’s not right. Say it this way.” Imitation works for some students some of the time, but for systematic work with correction, it’s important to work on 5 essential principles consistently! The key concept in teaching...
The most effective way — and the most intuitive way — to teach listening is through “top down processing.” This means focusing on “the big picture”, as if you’re observing a place from “above it”, understanding the gist of the information, analyzing the main ideas, and recalling key points. (The two other ways, less intuitive,...
Many teachers now have one-on-one or small group Zoom classes with their students. These can be great opportunities for learning — even better than live classes. But sometime these classes can “go south”, if the teacher is unprepared. Here are 5 tips to make sure your Zoom conversation classes are successful. 1. Be an active...