Design Successful Learning
Probably the least popular approach to teaching listening is “deliberate practice.”  It’s not popular because, well, it’s not fun, and it forces you to confront aspects of your skill that are effectively your weaknesses.  When I played high school basketball, my least favorite part of practice was “wind sprints.” Everyone would line up at the...
Many teachers justifiably believe that listening is not an isolated skill, and that it’s a waste of time to practice “just listening”.  In the real world, people are almost always listening with some other type of activity – viewing, talking, reading, or writing.   So for this type of teacher it certainly makes sense to...
  Another approach to teaching listening – which I like to use as a “signature approach” in academic contexts – is what I call “probing conversations” or “active conversations” or “academic conversations”.  This is really a way to get students to talk about what they understand, what they don’t understand, and how they might learn...
  When asked about approaches to teaching listening, I often recommend that teachers develop – or initially choose – a primary methodology around which to plan their instruction.   This is often more effective than “hit or miss” methods, or a smorgasbord of interesting listening-based activities. One approach that I love to use is “comprehension...
Attentive Listening   This is the first chapter from my (Michael Rost’s) Listening in Action, in which I explore four approaches to listening development.       Listening is an active process requiring participation on the part of the listener. Poor understanding results when listeners do not pay attention. Listeners may experience a lapse of...